Grameen Foundation Insights

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At Grameen Foundation, our goal is to spur innovation in the global movement to eliminate extreme poverty. Part of that work is to develop better solutions and share them with people like you.

On GF Insights, we share lessons learned from our leaders in the field, news about efforts to expand access to financial and information services for the poor, and how poverty-focused organizations are using data to improve the way they work.

Latest Posts

07/24/2012 by

Emily Hosoya is a Bankers without Borders® volunteer and Communications Intern with Grameen Foundation's Microsavings Initiative. We have included an excerpt from her post on our Progress out of Poverty blog, with a link to the full post below.

Since starting our work with CARD Bank in the Philippines, we’ve realized the best savings products are designed by the customers themselves. Although we’d love to sit down with each of CARD’s 500,000+ savings customers to discuss their needs, there is never enough time or resources to do so. Instead, with the help of our senior data analyst, Jacobo Menajovsky, we’ve created a process to use specific customer information to address our business questions and drive CARD’s product design and marketing strategy.

07/20/2012 by

Steve Wright is Vice President, Poverty Tools and Insights for Grameen Foundation. He recently wrote a blog post for Nexii.com. We have included an excerpt below, along with a link to the full post.

Let’s start with the realization that poverty is bad. The hardships of the poor fill heartstring-pulling fundraising campaigns: unsafe drinking water, poor diets, poor education, untreated illnesses, saving cash under a mattress, danger, a roof that leaks, no access to the information we take for granted, and more. These hardships make life more difficult for the poor than the not-poor. But this is not the only reason why poverty is bad.

Poverty is also bad because it hurts us all.

A very simple logic model for Poverty Alleviation

07/17/2012 by

David Washer is a Bankers without Borders® volunteer who recently returned from a project in Ethiopia. Upon graduating from Yale University, Washer began his career in portfolio management at McKinsey & Company, where he currently works as a financial analyst. During his time at Yale, he was actively involved in human rights advocacy and research, and now looks forward to using his knowledge of finance and international development in the service of colleagues overseas.

I've always had a healthy skepticism about short-term volunteer projects abroad. But as a Texas expatriate living in a Manhattan closet that passes for an apartment, I started to go a little stir-crazy as my heart for social justice from my undergraduate days began to beat again. The irony of it all? As an undergraduate, I had plenty of time – but no true, concrete skills to offer to development organizations. Once I began my work career, the opposite initially held true.

[caption id="attachment_2231" align="aligncenter" width="300"]David Washer (center) spent a week meeting clients and lending his skills in finance to Eshet, an Ethiopian MFI, as part of BwB’s Financial Modeling Reserve Corps. David Washer (center) spent a week meeting clients and lending his skills in finance to Eshet, an Ethiopian MFI, as part of BwB’s Financial Modeling Reserve Corps.[/caption]

I began to research and critically examine different service opportunities, and eventually came across Grameen Foundation's Bankers without Borders (BwB) program. Convinced that through this program I could help empower others to lead sustainable, grassroots development in their own communities abroad, I decided to join. I was not disappointed. Once I became a member of the Financial Modeling Blueprint Reserve Corps, BwB provided me with the training, templates and tools I needed to apply my financial analysis and modeling skills in a development context.

07/05/2012 by

Fiona Byarugaba, is Program Management and Communications Officer at Grameen Foundation’s AppLab Uganda office, and MTN/Grameen Foundation Relationship Manager. We have included a excerpt of her blog post followed by a link to the full post.

Samson Sabiiti Olet’s goat was suffering from a disease unknown to him. In a state of panic, Samson met his village Community Knowledge Worker, or CKW, telling him that the goat’s body was covered in “white dots.” After the CKW looked at the goat, he opened his phone, and within seven minutes had discovered that Samson’s goat was affected by ticks. Once Samson – a farmer from Oyam district, Adagayella village – started following the CKW’s advice about how to treat the goat for ticks, all was well, and the goat has gotten its healthy appetite back again.

07/03/2012 by

Michelle Katics, CEO of BankersLabTM, supports the MFI sector by providing pro-bono risk-management technical assistance to microfinance institutions (MFIs). BankersLab, through its corporate social responsibility program, supports Bankers without Borders®Bankers with VisionMFIOpenSource and Kiva. We have excerpted a portion of her blog post, followed by a link to the full post.

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