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Gender

Understanding Gender Norms in Rural Burkina Faso: A Qualitative Assessment

This report documents a series of qualitative assessments completed as part of a pilot test of the Pro-WEAI for the “Gender, Agriculture, and Assets Project – Phase 2” (GAAP2) project led by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). The Women’s Empowerment in Agriculture Index (WEAI) was launched by IFPRI, Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative (OPHI) and USAID’s Feed the Future program in February 2012 and was the first comprehensive standardized measure to capture women’s empowerment and inclusion in the agricultural sector.

Nutrition at the Center: Client Outcomes of the Rajasthan Nutrition Project

This report documents the final client outcomes from a pre-/post-test assessment completed during the Rajasthan Nutrition Project (RNP). RNP’s goal was to improve household nutrition, particularly among pregnant and lactating women and children, and aimed specifically improve breastfeeding rates, use of ORS to treat diarrhea, linkages to local health services and household food security. The results suggest that all targets were met, if not exceeded. Gender dynamics, as measured by mobility and decision-making power, also improved during the project period.

Factors Associated with Accessing Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) Scheme Among Women in Rural Rajasthan, India

The purpose of this study was to assess the Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) Scheme centre usage among women in rural Rajasthan and characteristics of households accessing these centres. The findings suggest that in rural Rajasthan, the majority of individuals access ICDS centres, especially supplementary food services. While supplementary food services can be effective in reducing childhood undernutrition, ICDS services in this region may consider increasing focus on other cost-effective and underutilized services, including breastfeeding education.

Who Breastfeeds Among Women Living in Tribal Communities in Rural Rajasthan, India?

While breastfeeding is culturally accepted in India, exclusive breastfeeding rates remain low, especially as the infant increases in age. This paper, developed using baseline data from the Rajasthan Nutrition Project, assesses the factors that influence whether women breastfeed initially and exclusively for six months. Findings from this paper suggest that breastfeeding rates are suboptimal, possibly as a result of food insecurity, financial status, and autonomy.

Rajasthan Nutrition Project: Integrating Financial, Agricultural, Nutrition Services and Gender: Baseline Report

Freedom from Hunger (now part of Grameen Foundation), together with its Indian affiliate organization Freedom from Hunger India Trust, and its Indian implementing non-governmental organization partners, Voluntary Association of Agricultural General Development Health and Reconstruction Alliance (VAAGDHARA) and Professional Assistance for Development Action (PRADAN), are collaborating to improve household nutrition in the Rajasthan districts of Banswara and Sirohi through the Rajasthan Nutrition Program (RNP).

Leveraging Services to Create New Pathways

Freedom from Hunger’s three-year initiative Building the Resilience of Vulnerable Communities in Burkina Faso (BRB), features the innovative use of community-based women’s savings groups (SGs) as a platform for providing a multi-sectoral integrated package of agricultural, nutrition, financial services, and women’s empowerment programmingto help thousands of SG members overcome many of the geographic, cultural, social and economic constraints that hamper their resiliency in the face of shocks and disasters.

Venus and Mars: Together or Separate in Financial Inclusion?

January 19, 2017 by Bobbi Gray

Many people consider the book, Men are from Mars, Women Are from Venus, by Dr. John Gray a classic. While it describes how men and women can better understand and relate to each other, it starts from the premise that men and women are simply from different planets. We don’t think or behave alike. We have different expectations for a relationship. But there are bridges that can bring us together—if we can locate and cross them effectively.

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