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Sub-Saharan Africa

Understanding Gender Norms in Rural Burkina Faso: A Qualitative Assessment

This report documents a series of qualitative assessments completed as part of a pilot test of the Pro-WEAI for the “Gender, Agriculture, and Assets Project – Phase 2” (GAAP2) project led by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). The Women’s Empowerment in Agriculture Index (WEAI) was launched by IFPRI, Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative (OPHI) and USAID’s Feed the Future program in February 2012 and was the first comprehensive standardized measure to capture women’s empowerment and inclusion in the agricultural sector.

Leveraging Services to Create New Pathways

Freedom from Hunger’s three-year initiative Building the Resilience of Vulnerable Communities in Burkina Faso (BRB), features the innovative use of community-based women’s savings groups (SGs) as a platform for providing a multi-sectoral integrated package of agricultural, nutrition, financial services, and women’s empowerment programmingto help thousands of SG members overcome many of the geographic, cultural, social and economic constraints that hamper their resiliency in the face of shocks and disasters.

Continuing Ebola vaccine research is still an urgent need

June 30, 2017 by Monica Amponsah

It has been five weeks since the latest Ebola outbreak and we are still holding our breaths. Four people died in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (one confirmed case and three suspected cases of the Ebola virus); eight people have been infected. Although the cases were found in a remote area of the country, it is a constant reminder that Ebola is still with us and can spread beyond African borders.

3 Ways to Increase Financial Inclusion in West Africa

May 19, 2017 by Sybil Chidiac

As M-PESA, the popular mobile phone-based money transfer service in Kenya turns ten this year, the progress towards financial inclusion in East Africa is evident. In Kenya and Tanzania, it is easier than ever to access financial services with only a mobile phone. But it is far different in West Africa, where the slower pace of development of mobile money has meant limited financial inclusion for some of the poorest communities on the continent.

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